3 Picks: Heat Tolerant Broccoli, Micro Gardening, Oil Prices


The Nourishmat

Below, are today’s three chosen agricultural-related news picks.

1) Heat Tolerant Broccoli: Michael Moss tells us the story of a Cornell scientist plant breeder, and his work to improve vegetable genetics. Get ready for the outcry! “Broccoli hates too much heat, which is why 90 percent of it sold in the United States comes from temperate California, which is often bathed by fog. The heads are fine if you live there, but for the rest of us they require a long truck ride (four or five days to the East Coast) and then some waiting time in a warehouse, tarnishing the appeal of a vegetable that health experts can’t praise enough.”

2) Micro Gardening and Nourishmats: For NPR, Eliza Barclay updates us on the latest and most efficient use of space for urban gardening. “While it’s probably tough to sustain a family on a micro-garden, FAO research shows that a well-tended micro-garden of 11 square feet can produce as much as 200 tomatoes a year, 36 heads of lettuce every 60 days, 10 cabbages every 90 days, and 100 onions every 120 days.”

3) Oil Prices: Laurel Graefe and Rebekah Durham at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta provide commentary on global oil prices. “However, the two seemingly opposing narratives—that of high oil prices and that of an emerging oil and gas abundance—are fundamentally linked. In fact, if it hadn’t been for such high oil prices, this new surge in North American oil production may not have happened. It is much more difficult to rationalize drilling activity in deep offshore areas, hard shale, or tar sands—from which, by nature, oil is expensive to produce—without high oil prices. (West Texas Intermediate, or WTI, oil averaged $31 per barrel in 2003, which, even in real terms, is only about 2/5 of today’s prices.) Analysts at Morgan Stanley estimate that the break-even point for Bakken (North Dakota) crude oil is about $70 per barrel and that even a price of $85 per barrel could squeeze out many of the unconventional producers. What does all this mean for prices? Well, keep in mind that oil is a global commodity. So the roughly two million barrels of oil per day that have entered the market from the U.S. fracking boom represent a big shift domestically but only just over 2 percent of global oil consumption.”

This news post was written and compiled by K. McDonald.

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